Spin.js uses the CSS3 to render the UI, falling back to VML Internet Explorer. If supported by the browser, @keyframe rules are used to animate the spinner. The spin() method creates the necessary HTML elements and starts the animation. If a target element is passed as argument, the spinner is added as first child and horizontally and vertically centered.

There is no images and external CSS for Spin.js. It is highly configurable, and works in all major browsers, including IE6. It is smaller than an animated GIF (2.8K minified, 1.7K gzipped).

Published under: Upload | MIT License

Google rolled out a new design across many of their services as part of the Google+ launch. The new look presents a sleeker, simplified Google that puts the emphasis on your data and not on the interface. Part of the design’s success are the new buttons.

Great UIs tend to have simple, obvious buttons that are standard across the entire application. Pixify has created Google+ Buttons in CSS that you can apply to your app’s UI. You can also check out Use Apple OS X Lion to Improve Your UI.

How to Create Google+ Buttons in CSS

Published under: Buttons | CC License

CSS Prism is a CSS color spectrum inspector. Input the path to any .css file, and it will output an easy to scan display of all hex colors from the file. Unwanted colors can be edited via a Photoshop-like color picker and the resulting .css file can be downloaded for your convenience.

The CSS Prism Bookmarklet will insert links to any webpage’s linked .css files just inside the body tag. CSS Prism will be quite helpful to you if you are building more sites at work.

CSS Prism – A CSS Color Spectrum Inspector

Published under: Color Schemes | License Free

For too long HTML email has been the ugly step-child of the web. It’s time for a change, so Campaign Monitor teamed up with some seriously talented designers to bring their skills to the world of HTML email.

There are 100+ Free HTML Email Templates with PSD source files. Every template has been thoroughly tested in more than 20 of the most popular email clients like Outlook 2010, Gmail, Lotus Notes, Apple Mail, the iPhone, and more. They’re ready to roll and are completely free.

Published under: Webmail

Treesaver is a JavaScript framework for creating magazine-style layouts that dynamically adapt to a wide variety of browsers and devices. Designers use standards-compliant HTML and CSS for both content and design, no JavaScript programming is required.

The JavaScript is under 25K gzipped. And it works with most modern browsers, and degrades gracefully for older browsers. However, Treesaver is still quite immature. There are still a lot of bugs that need to be fixed.

Published under: Framework | GPL License | MIT License

CSS3 Patterns Gallery contains all the beautiful patterns that are able to create with CSS3 gradients. The patterns themselves should work on Firefox 3.6+, Chrome, Webkit nightlies, Opera 11.10+ and IE10+.

However, implementation limitations might cause some of them to not be displayed correctly even on those browsers (for example at the time of writing, Opera doesn’t support radial gradients and Gecko is quite buggy with them).

CSS3 Patterns Gallery contains all the beautiful patterns that are able to create with CSS3 gradients.

Published under: Patterns | License Free

Galen Gidman has made a set of 30 CSS3 Progress Bars – each it’s own color. He is offering them as a 100% free download. Those progress bars were using no images what-so-ever… just CSS3. You can use them wherever you like, even in commercial projects.

You can also check out 2 Pure CSS Progress Bars with Animation we mentioned before. I am sure they will be useful when creating web applications.

Published under: Animation | License Free

The 1140 grid fits perfectly into a 1280 monitor. On smaller monitors it becomes fluid and adapts to the width of the browser. Beyond a certain point it uses media queries to serve up a mobile version, which essentially stacks all the columns on top of each other so the flow of information still makes sense.

Scrap 1024! Design once at 1140 for 1280, and with very little extra work, it will adapt itself to work on just about any monitor, even mobile.

It works perfectly in Chrome, Safari, Firefox, IE7 & IE8. And it has been tested on MacBooks, an iMac, a PC laptop, an old PC, an Eee PC, an iPad, an iPhone 3G, an iPhone 4, a few Android phones, a Samsung Galaxy Tab, a BlackBerry and an older Nokia.

Published under: CC License

Now that we can use CSS transitions in all the modern browsers with Ceaser – CSS Easing Animation Tool. Simply choose an easing type and test it out with a few effects. If you don’t quite like the easing, grab a handle and fix it. When you’re happy, snag your code and off you go.

Published under: Utilities | License Free

By far, one of the most frustrating parts of dealing with browser inconsistencies has got to be forms. Some designers advocate styling form elements to match the brand of a site. Others would tell you to leave them alone entirely, so that they adhere to the native look and feel of a given operating system.

SonSpring has come up with Formalize CSS. which bridges the gap between various browsers and OS’s, taking the best ideas from each, and implementing what is possible across the board. For the most part, this means most textual form elements have a slight inset, and all buttons look consistent, including the button tag

Published under: Forms | License Free