S4 is a general-purpose, distributed, scalable, partially fault-tolerant, pluggable platform that allows programmers to easily develop applications for processing continuous unbounded streams of data.

S4 fills the gap between complex proprietary systems and batch-oriented open source computing platforms. We aim to develop a high performance computing platform that hides the complexity inherent in parallel processing system from the application programmer.

S4 was released by Yahoo! Inc. in October 2010 under the Open Source Apache 2.0 license, which allows the user of the software the freedom to use the software for any purpose, to distribute it, to modify it, and to distribute modified versions of the software, under the terms of the license.

Published under: Framework | Apache License

Easel JS is a Javascript library for working with the HTML5 Canvas element. The new Canvas element in HTML5 is powerful, but it can be difficult to work with. It has no internal concept of discrete display elements, so you are required to manage updates manually. The Easel Javascript library provides a full, hierarchical display list, a core interaction model, and helper classes to make working with Canvas much easier.

Easel JS was built by gskinner.com, and is released under the MIT license, which means you can use it freely for almost any purpose including commercial projects.

Published under: Framework | MIT License

MongoDB (from “humongous”) is a scalable, high-performance, open source, document-oriented database. It is written in C++. They built MongoDB from our own experiences building large scale, high availability, robust systems. They didn’t start from scratch, they really tried to figure out what was broken, and tackle that.

So the way about MongoDB is that if you take MySql, and change the data model from relational to document based, you get a lot of great features: embedded docs for speed, manageability, agile development with schema-less databases, easier horizontal scalability because joins aren’t as important. There are lots of things that work great in relational databases: indexes, dynamic queries and updates to name a few, and they haven’t changed much there.

Open Source Scalable Document-Oriented Database

Published under: Framework | CC License

FUEL CMS is a modular-based hybrid of a framework and a content management system. It’s developed on the popular CodeIgniter PHP web framework and allows you to create your models, views and controllers like normal and only use the CMS part when and if you need it.

FUEL CMS evolved out of the need for having a development platform that was a Framework first and a CMS second. CodeIgniter fit the bill as a lightweight PHP framework that didn’t try and do too much behind the scenes. It allowed them to cleanly structure our code and use MVC principles.

They developed it so it could be easily integrated into your existing projects allowing you to select where and how you want to use the CMS. The interface is highly customizable and easily extensible with modules.

Published under: Framework | Apache License

Knockout is a JavaScript library that helps you to create rich, responsive display and editor user interfaces with a clean underlying data model. Any time you have sections of UI that update dynamically (e.g., changing depending on the user’s actions or when an external data source changes), Knockout can help you implement it more simply and maintainably.

It is a standalone library, can work with any JS framework and be implemented into any existing web application without huge changes.

Knockout is very well-documented and has several examples to ease the learning process.

Published under: Framework | License Free

jQuery Mobile is a user interface framework, built on top of jQuery, designed to simplify the process of building applications that target mobile devices.

There are two guiding principles of the jQuery Mobile project that differentiates it from most other offerings: It’s completely built on the principle of progressive enhancement and is designed to be functional in all HTML-capable mobile browsers.

There are demos and documentation for all the components in jQuery Mobile 1.0a1: Theming and Layout, Headers/Footers (Fixed and Persistent), Form Controls, Dialogs, List Views, Events, Transitions.

jQuery Mobile Alpha 1 Released

Published under: Framework | GPL License | MIT License

Jo is a JavaScript framework for HTML5 capable browsers and devices. It was originally designed to work on mobile platforms as a GUI and light data layer on top of PhoneGap.

Since its creation, Jo has also been tested successfully as a lightweight framework for mobile browsers, newer desktop browsers, and even Dashboard widgets. Jo is under a friendly OpenBSD License. Minified JavaScript is just over 8K with no dependancies.

Published under: Framework | License Free

jQuery Masonry is a layout plugin for jQuery. Think of Masonry as the flip side of CSS floats. Where as floats arrange elements horizontally then vertically, Masonry arranges them vertically then horizontally. The result leaves no vertical gaps between elements of varying height, just like a mason fitting stones in a wall. Masonry will work with all structural elements: div’s, lists, p’s, spans.

There are no setting or options within in the plugin. Instead, all spacing properties can be set with CSS. The only property required for Masonry to work is for the width of the child elements. Child elements should be should have equal width in order to avoid any overlapping.

Published under: Framework | License Free

There are some great JavaScript testing frameworks out there. Many only work from within a browser. Most don’t support testing asynchronous code like event callbacks. Some have syntax that’s hard for JS developers or IDEs to understand.

Jasmine is a JavaScript testing framework. It’s heavily influenced by, and borrows the best parts of, ScrewUnit, JSSpec, JSpec, and of course RSpec. Jasmine is not tied to any browser, framework, platform, or host language. It work anywhere JavaScript can run, including browsers, servers, phones, etc.

Published under: Framework | MIT License

One of the more interesting and fun aspects of iPad usage is the ability to effect change in a webpage by swiping a finger across the screen of the iPad. For example, swiping to the left to navigate to the next page in a series of pages, or swiping to display the next image in a series of images. For iPad users, these actions are intuitive and natural.

However, for those who compose webpages, adding touch detection to a page can be a challenging and difficult process. No more. The information presented on Padilicious: Add Finger-Swipe Support to Webpages, will make it easy to add touch sensing to your pages, requiring only a minimum of JavaScript coding on your part.

Published under: Framework | License Free