Kippt is a new and elegant way to bookmark and save notes. Kippt makes it easy to save, organize, search and read information you find on the web.

Found something awesome? You can add it to your Inbox or Read Later list and deal with it later. Organize the best stuff in to lists. You can also drag & drop links to lists. No tags, just search. Read long articles in the reader mode. There are also browser extensions to make it even easier.

Published under: Utilities | License Free

Tilt represents a new way of visualizing a web page. This tool creates a 3D representation of the document, with the purpose of displaying, understanding and easily analyzing the DOM.

It will take advantage of the great tools Firefox has to offer, as it is an extension which contains a WebGL implementation, providing rich user-experience, fun interaction and useful information, while taking full advantage of 3D hardware acceleration, GLSL shaders and what OpenGL ES 2.0 has to offer.

The implementation consists of a Firefox extension containing a 3D representation of a web page, as both a fun visualization tool and a developer-friendly environment for debugging the document’s structure, contents and nesting of the DOM tree. Various information besides the actual contents will be displayed on request, regarding each node’s type, class, id, and other attributes if available. The rendering will be dynamic, in-browser, using WebGL and GLSL shaders.

Published under: Code | Utilities

It’s hard to believe what began as couple of computers communicating through phone lines now forms the foundation for our jobs and allows even more our mothers to be bloggers. But none of this would be possible without The Web Standards Project fighting to persuade browser makers to support common standards.

Vitamin T and An Event Apart has designed a lovely infographic: A Brief History of Web Standards that looks at the past, present and future of Web Standards. Journey with us into the recent past―and who knows, what you learn may enable you to make your contribution the next major bullet point in the timeline of the Internet!

Published under: Information

Today most developers already know how to quickly code a menu or a layout structure, but there’re always a great difficulty when coding a form, either contact, login, newsletter, comment etc.

Formee is nothing but a framework to help you develop and customize web based forms. works with the technique provided by Fluid 960 Grid System to compose the form’s layout, allowing total flexibility to put it in any website or web system.

The form has a structure built around percentage widths, thus allowing its inclusion in any project, adapting to the space available. Formee has its structural code independent of the style codes, facilitating the complete customization and manteinance of the form.

The form was built with care to preserve web standards and their semantic values, working with the smallest possible amount of tags and according to the W3C rules.

Published under: Forms | GPL License | MIT License

Tutorialzine has written a great tutorial: Create an iOS-like Home Screen using CoffeeScript. CoffeeScript is a neat programming language meant to enhance the good parts of JavaScript, while working around the not so good. It makes OOP easy and introduces a number of useful additions such as comprehensions, new syntax for functions and scope handling, along with numerous small improvements.

But don’t fall pray to the hype surrounding it just yet – CoffeeScript isn’t going to replace JavaScript any time soon, as it sacrifices some of the agility that JS provides in attempt to make development easier. The CS way might not be the best fit for your project.

Published under: Menu | License Free

jTicker takes an elements’ children and displays them one by one, in sequence, writing their text ‘ticker tape’ style. It is smart enough to ticker text from an element heirarchy, inserting elements back into the DOM tree as it needs them. That means almost any content can be ‘tickered’.

jTicker handles any number of alternating cursors (or just one). jTicker’s cursor container is styleable using the class .cursor, or can be defined as your own jQuery object. jTicker reacts to jQuery events “play”, “stop” and “control”.

Published under: Fonts | License Free

Tangle is a JavaScript library for creating reactive documents. Your readers can interactively explore possibilities, play with parameters, and see the document update immediately. It is a lightweight library that provides a simple API for tangling up the values in your document. Tangle.js has no dependencies, and works with any JavaScript framework, or none at all.

TangleKit is an optional collection of UI components that let your readers adjust values and visualize the results. You can grab whichever components you want, use them, extend them, modify them, or just learn from them and make your own. TangleKit also includes (and depends on) a few helpful libraries, such as MooTools, sprintf, and BVTouchable.

Published under: Framework | MIT License

Have you ever thought of combine your Twitter, Digg, Facebook and Delicious counters into one single counter? The Share Counter can be fully customized by CSS. It loads pretty fast with only 2kb. It’s easy to use, you simply add or rename the classes of the link to be shared and the element that will hold the counts.

You may use the Share Counter in non-commercial and commercial projects. It may also be included in other software, themes and templates intended for sale or distribution.

Published under: Stats | License Free

Seth Nickerson has designed a set of amazing patterns, called Pattern Kit. There are six variations he made from the base tile, but you can also roll your own. Those patterns are free to use for whatever you want. I think they will be really useful for some pretty classy web designs.

Published under: Patterns | License Free

jwerty is a JS lib which allows you to bind, fire and assert key combination strings against elements and events. It normalises the poor std api into something easy to use and clear. All jwerty events will require a jwertyCode in some way. jwertyCodes can be passed as strings, or arrays, strings being the easiest way to express a combo.

jwerty is a small library, weighing in at around 1.5kb bytes minified and gzipped (~3kb minified). jwerty has no dependencies, but is compatible with jQuery, Zepto or Ender if you include those packages alongside it.

Published under: Framework | MIT License